Performance as Publishing

Author Archives: performance

  1. I, I, I, I, I, I, I, Kathy Acker, ICA, London

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    “In a 1996 text, Acker wrote: ‘Language is the accumulation of connections where there were no such connections’, and referred to a kind of language ‘that makes webs’. […] Acker is an exceptional figure in late-20th-century Western literature who moved between the avant-garde art and literary scenes of New York, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle, Paris and London. Through her prolific writing, Acker developed experimental textual methodologies as she distorted language, hybridised fiction and autobiography, ‘plagiarised’ the work of other authors, and introduced maps, drawings and diagrams.”

    www.ica.art/exhibitions/i-i-i-i-i-i-i-kathy-acker

  2. PaperWork: iilwimi lipsing, serf, Leeds

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    “I like how it sounds a bit like wimmin. Wimmin-ing. It’s queer and i and i, like we. It’s lots. Very plural-y. And very very and so. Sounds like lips and ellipses and singing and kissing and something about size, like a thing that is small and growing. It’s funny how ppl get upset from internet comments about bad lipsing. Lipsing is verby it’s doing. It’s now. It’s painting the chin and cheeks so the lips stand out. It’s a tongue in another mouth. To go inside your body. The i’s are quite wavy i and i and i and i and i and i. It’s slow then it’s fast. I’m thinking about the shapes the sound makes my mouth. what words do with me. ii is air muscled out. When did I suck that air iin even? iilwimi lipsing is nice to say softly against the hand. Rushy.”

    A night of art writing: performance, soundings and screening by artists Carl Gent, Alison Ballance, Uma Breakdown and Halima Haruna with PaperWork Magazine.

    www.facebook.com/PaperWorkMag/

  3. ORGASMIC STREAMING ORGANIC GARDENING ELECTROCULTURE

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    “ORGASMIC STREAMING   ORGANIC GARDENING   ELECTROCULTURE is a group exhibition looking at practices that emerge between text and performance, the page and the body, combining a display and events programme of historical and contemporary works. It seeks an alternative framework to look at the influence of conceptual procedures as well as experimental writing within contemporary feminist performance practices across visual art, sound and text. The exhibition seeks to highlight these significant trans-historical sensibilities, whilst acknowledging their disjuncts. Each artist brings a particular method, procedure or interrogation to the act of writing or performing text, blurring descriptions such as text, score, work, performance, version and iteration.”

    — www.chelseaspace.org

  4. Judith Butler, Notes toward a Performative Theory of Assembly, published by Harvard Press

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    “Judith Butler elucidates the dynamics of public assembly under prevailing economic and political conditions, analysing what they signify and how. Understanding assemblies as plural forms of performative action, Butler extends her theory of performativity to argue that precarity – the destruction of the conditions of livability – has been a galvanizing force and theme in today’s highly visible protests.”

    www.hup.harvard.edu

  5. Wysing Polyphonic, Cambridgeshire

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    “A fully acoustic art and music festival that explores the sonic potential of the voice, instruments and objects:
    “SAVORR discusses the nature of sound – its meaning, its potential, its limits and its history…
    “Primary artists Frank Abbott, Bruce Asbestos, Wayne Burrows, Rebecca Lee, Alison Lloyd and Reactor come together in a variety of combinations to explore the lines between sound and language, sense and non-sense…
    “OUTPOST presents ‘The Temporary Research Centre for Myths, Stories, Tales and Fables’, exploring the nature and themes of stories and how they are remembered, told, and passed on…”

    — www.wysingartscentre.org

  6. Performing to the Camera, Tate Modern, London

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    “This exhibition explores the relationship between the two forms, looking at how performance artists use photography and how photography is in itself a performance. It shows how photographs have captured performances […] and ground-breaking collaborations between photographers, performers and dancers. It looks at how artists […] have used photography as a stage on which to perform.”

    — www.tate.org.uk

     

  7. Blog post #3, Lux artists’ moving image

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    “Describing our project as ‘performance to camera’ really points to the idea of a performance mediated through a camera and an audience who only sees that end product. It implies conscious decisions about what the camera sees and how this translates to an online audience.”

    www.lux.org.uk/blog/